by Andrew Smoot

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In a time where so much emphasis is placed on what is considered to popular in order to determine what is good and bad, this prompt allowed me to really do some soul searching (as well as the rest of the course work). It’s impossible to not approach this from a Christian world view, well rather it was the most biblically correct way to approach this therefore; Jackie Robinsons chief accomplishment was proving that while being an African American, by taking personal responsibility and cultivating self-control that he too (and anybody then) could achieve great things and leave a legacy that others could follow, the most notably recent example is Colin Kaepernick, while I am not sure of his ethnic origins his actions are well appreciated by many.

On the opposite ends of the spectrum is Michael Jordan who has refused to involve his “brand”, (I say brand because it is after all the star power that gets the attention of the masses long before they find out whether or not you practice what you preach.) publicly in any way that would cause someone to make socio-political decision based upon his influence. Jackie Robinson went as far as too allow the African American community including his own son to ostracize and criticize him in order to maintain the integrity of his campaign to influence “America” to “play fair” again proving that a man’s character and work ethic should be what decides what kind of open doors and opportunities become available to him. Ever since Adam was influenced to bite the fruit in the garden, man’s intrinsic lack of worth and identity has caused him not only to enslave himself, but others too. Jackie’s message was clear, he walked quiet but carried a big stick, “Don’t call me n*gger!

 

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Written by jeff

Jeffrey C. Suttles is a Master of Arts candidate in Liberal Studies at the City University of New York, Graduate Center. He is an independent writer/musician/humanitarian who completed his undergraduate studies at The City College of New York. He is currently a CUNY CAP student who continues to pursue career...
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